Resources for Coronavirus / COVID-19

Latest AISI News & Happenings

March 26th - AISI signs onto a multi-association letter to CISA Director Christopher Krebs asking for confirmation that employees who manufacture motor vehicle parts for vehicle manufacturing and repair are critical manufacturing employees

March 25th - US steelmakers urge continuation of tariff protocols in virus response (Steel Business Briefing)

March 24th - Steel Associations Letter to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)

March 24th - AISI Letter to the National Governors Association

With numerous states ordering businesses to limit or cease operations in recent days, it is important to emphasize to governors that the steel industry, including its supply chain, is essential and must be allowed to continue to operate. AISI president and CEO, Tom Gibson, today sent a letter to Maryland Governor Larry Hogan, Chairman of the National Governors Association (NGA), urging NGA to advise leaders in all states to designate the steel manufacturing sector, its suppliers and its workers as essential when drafting and enforcing stay-at-home orders and other directives in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

March 24th - AISI Publication: Weekly Economic Update

AISI will issue a weekly economic update on the first business day of each week until further notice. The update is intended to briefly summarize in one place the latest steel-relevant industry and economic data.

March 23rd - With Washington on a 'war footing,' a push to protect factories and workers amid pandemic (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

March 20th - AISI Sends Letter to Governor Wolf (PA) Regarding 'Life-Sustaining' Industries

March 19th - Transportation Construction Council (TCC) Sends Letter to Congressional Leadership

March 18th - AISI Letter to Vice President Pence on why steel manufacturing and steelworkers are 'essential'

 

https://www.steelbb.com/?PageID=157&print_all=1&article_id=187514

Due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) global pandemic, there are a lot of questions, concerns and unknowns about how to take care of yourself and those around you. We will update this page with new information as it comes available and we hope these helpful guidelines and resources will provide some assistance.

 

Information from: Center for Disease Control (CDC) Prevention

Know How it Spreads

  • There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
  • The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.
  • The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.
    • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
    • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.
  • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

Take steps to protect yourself

Clean your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid close contact

 

Take steps to protect others

Stay home if you’re sick

Cover coughs and sneezes

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Wear a facemask if you are sick

  • If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a facemask if they enter your room. Learn what to do if you are sick.
  • If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers.

Clean and disinfect

  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.