Steel Group Lauds Passage of Bridge Amendment

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For Immediate Release
July 24, 2013

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) today applauded the Senate passage of an amendment to ensure that bridges most in need of repair are fixed ahead of any others. The measure, introduced by Senator Rob Portman (R-OH), calls for bridges that have been classified by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) as "functionally obsolete" or "structurally deficient" to receive priority consideration for new federal bridge funding under the $500 million “Bridges in Critical Corridors” fund.  The new program is included in the Transportation and Housing and Urban Development (THUD) appropriations bill.

Thomas J. Gibson, president and CEO of AISI, said, “Our nation’s infrastructure needs are at critical mass. According to the American Society of Civil Engineers, nearly 25 percent of our nation’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete, and our deteriorating surface transportation infrastructure could cost the American economy more than 876,000 jobs.  Investments in surface transportation directly impact the competitiveness of the manufacturing sector, especially by increasing demand for steel fabricated products which creates valuable steel jobs.  Senator Portman’s amendment will help address this serious national concern and put critical bridge repair funds where they are needed most.” 


Contact: Lisa Harrison
202.452.7115 / lharrison@steel.org


AISI serves as the voice of the North American steel industry in the public policy arena and advances the case for steel in the marketplace as the preferred material of choice.  AISI also plays a lead role in the development and application of new steels and steelmaking technology.  AISI is comprised of 24 member companies, including integrated and electric furnace steelmakers, and 125 associate members who are suppliers to or customers of the steel industry.  AISI’s member companies represent over three quarters of both U.S. and North American steel capacity.  For more news about steel and its applications, view AISI’s website at www.steel.org.